First twilight dissemination meeting at Jump Primary School, Barnsley

We had a very good evening and the staff at Jump Primary were fantastic!  (Say thank you again to them from me Zoe.)  I changed things round a bit from my original programme, deciding that everything except the `Danger of a Single Story’ should go first.

So I began with a short introduction about the project- mainly for Lucy’s benefit as Zoe’s staff already knew something about the background.  I was able to flag up the online CPD unit on the Geographical Association website:

Image

I then shared the address of this WordPress website/ blog and asked Zoe and John to say a little about their project – which they did as a quick overview.

Next, we talked about what we’d learnt from the project, i.e.  `Steps on our learning journey’ and then moved onto look at `The Geographical Questions’ that I had linked to our fieldwork visit around Wortley Village.  These can usefully be used in relation to places in our parts of the country/ world and our Year 2 project group found them very valuable. (They also enjoyed their fieldwork experience.)

Image

We ended with the Danger of a Single Story, which went down very well with all of our teachers – we had some very positive comments at the end of the session which I felt had a significant impact on their thinking.  It will be good to see how they follow up this initial input.

Advertisements

Principles that should underpin any curriculum work which seeks to integrate Geography and the Global Dimension

A geographical understanding of the world (places and spaces and people’s relationship with them) supports a greater understanding of global issues / key concepts (interdependence, human rights, values & perceptions, global citizenship, social justice, diversity, sustainability, conflict resolution).

  • The Danger of a Single Story: teachers need to be aware of the limitations of their own perspective on issues, places and people; to broaden and deepen their own and pupils’ understanding and challenge assumptions, prejudice and discrimination. 
  • The Global in the Local: recognise the global context of our local lives.
  • Recognise the interconnectedness of people, places and spaces locally and globally
  • Here as well as there: we need to ask the same questions in our own locality / country as in other localities across the world.  Understanding their own locality helps children to understand distant ones (e.g. look at local forests when studying rainforests).

Some principles drawn from Year 2 of the project