Four ways you could follow-up from the third twilight session of Geography and the Global Dimension

  1. Locate the page `Living Geography’ which is part of the Geography and Global Dimension On-line CPD unit and then plan an activity that involves fieldwork and the children you teach.
  2. Look at the case studies on this Blog site and choose one to adapt for your own teaching – they are all listed along the banner at the top of this page.
  3. Download the PowerPoint from the Planning and Resources Page of the GA CPD Unit and adapt it for a unit of work that you are going to teach – you will find examples of ways our teachers have done this if you check out the case studies.  You’ll find Zoe’s version for her Chembakolli Unit here >>>
  4. Share some of the work that you have done with your children so that we can build up a wider bank of case-studies.
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Ideas for teaching younger children about Geography and the Global Dimension

At the last session of the Geography and Global Dimension twilight session some teachers of younger children expressed concerns that we hadn’t focused enough on early years.  Here are some suggestions for where you might look:

Using Picture Books to develop geography & Global Citizenship 

Starting from a picture book – What if? (ESD)

Start Local Think Global  scroll down the page until you come to `If you’re not from the …’ and `When I went to the …’

Geography and Food

Journey’s Place and Landscape (Foundation Stage)

Africa: Your School, My School (Year 1)

Principles that should underpin any curriculum work which seeks to integrate Geography and the Global Dimension

A geographical understanding of the world (places and spaces and people’s relationship with them) supports a greater understanding of global issues / key concepts (interdependence, human rights, values & perceptions, global citizenship, social justice, diversity, sustainability, conflict resolution).

  • The Danger of a Single Story: teachers need to be aware of the limitations of their own perspective on issues, places and people; to broaden and deepen their own and pupils’ understanding and challenge assumptions, prejudice and discrimination. 
  • The Global in the Local: recognise the global context of our local lives.
  • Recognise the interconnectedness of people, places and spaces locally and globally
  • Here as well as there: we need to ask the same questions in our own locality / country as in other localities across the world.  Understanding their own locality helps children to understand distant ones (e.g. look at local forests when studying rainforests).

Some principles drawn from Year 2 of the project